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Conservation Projects

Conservation Projects at RBG

RBG’s conservation efforts occur in forest, wetland and prairie habitats and range from species at risk inventories to invasive alien species management.

In additions to our display gardens and horticultural conservation work, Royal Botanical Gardens works hard to preserve and restore its nature sanctuaries. This includes Project Paradise —one of the largest freshwater restoration projects of its kind in North America— that works to restore aquatic habitats of Cootes Paradise and Grindstone Creek marshes.

  • Staff Measuring Fish At Fishway Credit Markzelinski.com
  • Bald Eagle Eaglet in Nest
  • Grey Doe Trail Boardwalk In Fall
  • Volunteers Installing Fence Posts
  • Field Burning at Princess Point

Major Projects

Royal Botanical Gardens’ 1,100 hectares is dominated by nature sanctuaries enveloping the western end of Lake Ontario. These properties are dominated by three types of habitats: wetlands, forest, and prairies. With more than 750 native plant species, 277 types of migratory birds, 37 mammal species, 14 reptile species, 9 amphibian species and 68 species of Lake Ontario fish, the area is an important contributor to ecosystems that span international borders.

Credit: Markzelinski.com

Wetland Restoration

An innovative freshwater marsh restoration venture, Project Paradise includes a range of conservation projects with a long-term goal is to create the underlying conditions for ecosystem recovery.

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Credit: Markzelinski.com

Prairie Restoration

RBG’s nature sanctuaries contain about 37 hectares of meadows, which have crucial flowers, food plants and habitat for pollinators like bees and butterflies, as well as open-area birds and mammals.

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Forest Protection

The Nature Sanctuaries at Royal Botanical Gardens are home too 400 hectares (1,000 acres) of forest ecosystem with over 70 species of trees.

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Bald Eagles

In 2013, RBG was home to the first eaglets to hatch on the Canadian shoreline of Lake Ontario in over 50 years.

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Credit: markzelinski.com

Fishway

Located at the mouth of the Desjardins Canal, RBG’s Fishway is protecting native species and their wetland habitats.

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Special Protection Areas

To ensure that all species have an opportunity to persist, 20 percent of RBG’s nature sanctuaries remain without formal trails, creating core areas protected from human and other associated disturbances. These areas have been named ‘Special Protection Areas’. For the visitor, next to these areas there are observation points and interpretive signage to help you appreciate the significance of these unique spaces.

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Support Conservation at RBG

These conservation projects are possible thanks to the generous support of RBG Members and donors. With a donation to Growing up Green, you can ensure an active, vibrant and healthy future for the children of today and tomorrow through our horticultural and conservation projects.

Additional Resources

Learn more about RBG’s conservation efforts with these downloadable PDF resources.